Proprioception Activities

Many proprioceptive activities happen or can happen naturally in the classroom. These activities are generally quick and can be thought of as “sensory snacks.” When spread out naturally throughout the day, they can have a calming an organizing affect on the child.

It can be easy to incorporate proprioceptive activities in your routines at home as well. Activities can be added as chores or jobs for kids to do. Or, existing activities can be modified to include proprioception. Proprioceptive activities can be used at home, especially before calm activities such as meals and rest time to help calm and organize your child.

Proprioceptive Activities in the Classroom
  • Ask the child to remove chairs from tables at the beginning of the day or activity and puts them back up at the end of the day/activity
  • Drag or rearrange furniture such as moving desks or chairs into a circle for a special part of the day.
  • Use squirt bottles and sponges or rags to clean tables or the board
  • Pushing or pulling a box or cart of supplies
  • Make "special deliveries"
    • return a stack of books to the library, get supplies from the office such as a stack of paper, etc.
  • Carry or push the box or tray of milk cartons
  • Sharpen pencils using a manual pencil sharpener
  • Use the dye cut machine (with supervision) to cut out shapes - could take “orders” from staff.
  • Cut through several layers of construction paper
  • Staple packets of paper or staple paper onto a bulletin board
  • Chair push-ups
  • Climbing activities - such as on the playground
  • Use quiet squeeze toys or resistive putty prior to fine motor work

Proprioceptive Activities You Can Do At Home

  • Household chores
    • Vacuum
    • Sweep or mop
    • Carry the laundry
    • Wipe off the table
    • Carry a watering can to water plants
    • Wash windows using spray bottle
  • Yard Work
    • Rake leaves
    • Push the wheelbarrow
    • Shovel sand or dirt into a wheelbarrow
    • Help in a garden digging, hoeing, raking, pulling weeds, etc.
    • Shovel snow
  • Carry, push, or pull heavy items such as a basket or cart full of books or groceries
  • Chew gum, eat chewy foods, sip water through a straw, suck thick “liquids” through a straw such as pudding, jello, or applesauce
    • Do this just prior to meal time or incorporate chewy foods into meals for kids with oral sensitivity
  • Stack cushions or pillows
  • Have (safe) pillow fights or set up pillows and cushions for your child to crash into
  • Have the child help rearrange furniture
  • Play games, read, or color while on hands an knees
  • Participate in sports activities involving running and jumping
    • Tae Kwondo or other martial arts
    • Gymnastics
    • Football
    • Track and Field
    • Etc.
  • Jump on a mini trampoline, jump rope, or jump into pillows or leaves
  • Play catch using heavy balls or beanbags
  • Do animal walks (have races!) such as crab and bear walks
  • Push-ups
    • Wall Push ups by pushing against a wall
    • Regular push ups or kneeling push ups
    • Chair push ups
    • Couch push ups (have legs on couch and arms on floor and do pushups)